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Study In China

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Study in China

Education in China is a state-run system of public education run by the Ministry of Education. All citizens must attend school for at least nine years, known as the nine-year compulsory education, which the government funds. It includes six years of primary education, starting at age six or seven, and three years of junior secondary education (middle school) for ages 12 to 15. Some provinces may have five years of primary school but four years for middle school. After middle school, there are three years of high school, which then completes the secondary education. The Ministry of Education reported a 99 percent attendance rate for primary school and an 80 percent rate for both primary and middle schools.
In 1985, the government abolished tax-funded higher education, requiring university applicants to compete for scholarships based on academic ability. In the early 1980s the government allowed the establishment of the first private school, increasing the number of undergraduates and people who hold doctoral degrees fivefold from 1995 to 2005. In 2003 China supported 1,552 institutions of higher learning (colleges and universities) and their 725,000 professors and 11 million students. There are over 100 National Key Universities, including Peking University and Tsinghua University. Chinese spending has grown by 20% per year since 1999, now reaching over $100bn, and as many as 1.5 million science and engineering students graduated from Chinese universities in 2006. China published 184,080 papers as of 2008.China has also become a top destination for international students. As of 2013, China is the most popular country in Asia for international students, and ranks third overall among countries. (Source: Wikipedia)

WHY STUDY IN CHINA:


Research and anecdotes from students show that China is becoming more popular among international learners and that it has many benefits for graduate prospects.Students looking to study abroad have an increasing number of options and China is becoming more and more popular, according to research done among international students.
1. You’ll be joining a growing trend:

China is an increasingly popular destination for students from around the world, with the number of international students in China doubling in the past 10 years.

China is already the fourth most popular destination for travel generally and has the third-largest population of international students, behind the US and the UK.Further, choosing to study in China is a smart move for anyone looking to try something slightly out of the ordinary, while knowing that you’ll be in good company.

2. There are more options than ever

Over the past 10 years, international visitors and students have been going “deeper” into China, choosing to travel to a wider range of cities than before.

In the past, Shanghai and Beijing were the only cities where it was common to see international students.

Today, there are 13 cities across China with more than 10,000 international students, with seven cities having more than 20,000 students.

Popular cities include Guangdong in the south of China and Liaoning, north of Beijing.

3. Chinese universities have a growing reputation

Whether you intend to secure a graduate job or continue studying at postgraduate level, the reputation of your university is important for your future prospects.

Chinese universities are increasingly well respected; the number included in major global university rankings has risen significantly over the past five years, particularly compared with the UK, which has fallen in many rankings.

4. The government is investing heavily in international students

Financial support is an important factor in the decision to study abroad and the Chinese government is offering a wide range of funding opportunities to attract international students, including more than 40,000 scholarships at 277 institutions.

5. It could be great for your career

Knowledge and experience of China is an increasingly valuable asset in many industries.

As the fourth most popular destination for international travel, with nearly 12 million business trips to China in 2015, the country is growing in economic and cultural significance.

Experience of China and Chinese, which is the third most popular language to learn in the world, could give you a great career boost. (Source: www.timeshighereducation.com)